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Now Available for Ordering!

Doug Johnson's book "The Musical Body" is now available for order! A collection of Doug's artwork documenting a marathon of rehearsal and recording sessions in the summer of 2021. Beautiful images of musicians singing, playing wind and string instruments, piano, and harp. Pick up your copy today ($35/copy, $5 shipping with mailed delivery). Use the button below to place an order!

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Watch a video of Douglas Johnson painting musicians Katie Procell & Valerie Hsu while watching them perform in a live-streamed concert on 6.20.20

"Andersen," Watercolor on Paper, happily hung in a home

"Andersen,"

Watercolor 18"w x 24"h

as it resides in a private collection

Projects

"There's nothing really linear about paint - there's nothing really linear about what we see: we see enmeshed pieces of color interacting in certain ways."

"People have a glow about them, especially around the lips, the eyes, the ears... there's a luminosity there..."

"It was my work in theater that reconnected me with the reason I loved painting in the first place. I'd forgotten. I've always loved transporting people, touching their imaginations. Telling a story, or showing them a character or place to see their own story in a new way. Light, color, the figure in motion... it's all so beautiful."

"We forget how closely our lives, physically and spiritually, are linked with animals. From our myths to the milk we drink, we are so dependent on them. Some relationships are clearer: the bees pollinating our crops. Looking into the science of it, there is so much we don't know, but we use. We could never make milk or honey in a lab, we need organic machinery to make such complex things.
A man milks the venom out of a rattlesnake by forcing its fangs over the rim of a beaker. The poison drips down the inside of the glass. We are told this is make anti-venom. What we're usually not told is that the poison is then diluted and injected into horses. The doses are increased slowly over time as the horses' natural antivenom becomes more concentrated. The blood is drawn, the antidote is separated from it for us to use. That is where the painting Communion comes from."
"When my partner is driving us on one of our many road trips, I will set up an assortment of paints, inks, and markers to quickly capture the landscape as it sails by. I'll take a mental snapshot of the view, the light, and mood, and then translate it to the paper in staccato strokes."